Monthly Archives: October 2021

Monthly Archives: October 2021

Understanding Data Science And Art

There has always been a lot of talk about whether and how artificial intelligence can start making art. And of course, it can. After all, as is well known, everything can be art! However, there is too little discussion about how a data scientist can help the arts in relation to study and research.

Data science combines multiple fields including artificial intelligence (AI), statistics, data analysis and scientific methods to extract value from data.

Art as data

data scientist

You are currently seeing more art digitized than ever before, with art available online and libraries giving you access to texts as online and downloadable copies. It has even spawned a number of really amazing collaborations with other popular online areas. For example, many world-famous art galleries have chosen to make their collections available in the game Animal Crossing. This means that players can have virtual money in their virtual home.

By making art available in this way, it becomes data. On the one hand, this can create a lot of new problems for institutions that are traditionally unprepared.

Digital art is based on technology. It’s audio, video, animation, immersive experiences, GIFs, code, hybrid mixes of physical and digital, and more. It requires the existence of technology like hardware, storage drives, software, the Internet, media players, etc. And therein lies the issue. Given the speed of change, it is not an issue of whether the technology fails or becomes obsolete, but when.

There are of course a number of challenges, but also enormous potential. This is because digitizing a work of art as part of good practice means cataloging information along with the art itself. So don’t just scan a portrait and put it online, but also include metadata. This information includes dates like the artist. This allows the art to be stored in an organized way as a digital version of the manual cataloging used previously.

Art and data: A simple look at why this is useful

This metadata allows researchers to edit the art very easily and quickly, which is much more complicated and time-consuming to do manually.

For example, the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s website offers a search function for their collections. This allows you to quickly search for an artist and see the results broken down into a number of filters. This gives an instant insight that would otherwise require a lot of manual sourcing and knowledge.

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12 Things That Makes Bar Movie Scenes Unrealistic

Bar

 

Of all the gin joints all told the towns all told the globe, she walks into…one that appears like that?! I’ve got no idea what gin joints sounded like back within the 1940s but I’m guessing it absolutely was nothing just like the obvious studio set which served as Rick’s Café Américain in Casablanca. Hollywood could also be great at creating a verisimilitude of nearly everything–Wall Street, the western United States, even outer space–but there’s one setting they always fuck up: bars. Regardless of the standard of the movie, regardless of the pedigree of the cast and crew, cinema simply cannot depict a bar that appears and sounds like anyone you have ever visited within the universe.

1) THEY’RE TOO BRIGHT

As bright as big-box electronics stores, Movie bars are always lit up. Maybe if we gave the impression of Ryan Gosling or Emma Stone in Crazy Stupid Love we’d move to crazy stupid bright bars as their characters do. Unfortunately, we do not and, thus, bars within the planet are dimly lit to help our romances (I mean, beer goggles).

2) THEY’RE OVERLARGE

Bars within the planet are cramped and crowded places where people need to shuffle sideways simply to urge from one side to the opposite. Movie bars are big as gymnasiums: Cafe Americain, Jack Rabbit Slim’s (Pulp Fiction), The Titty Twister (From Dusk Till Dawn), as movie sets need ample space for cameras and equipment. They also use props like space-saving acrylic and bar stools that avoid occupying a lot of space. Why it takes Henry Hill an honest minute-and-a-half to steer from one side of The Bamboo Lounge to the opposite.

3) THEY’RE TOO QUIET

Now I do not particularly like loud bars. It’s one reason I’m going during the “real” happy hour. During quiet hours are loud, even quiet bars. Not within the movies though, where characters like Will Hunting easily have lengthy conversations using their “inside voices.”

4) THEY’RE TOO GLAMOROUS (OR WAY TOO FILTHY)

Movie bars are never the sawdust and beer-soaked places most people frequent. Even their bathrooms are spotless places for doing all of your makeup…or coke. (I said goddamn!) That’s another excuse real-world bars are so dark–you ever stumble into one when the house lights are still up? It’s sort of a biohazard scene.

5) FELLOW PATRONS ARE NEVER NORMAL

Recreation, Interaction, Indoor games and sports, Games, Display device, Conversation, Barware, Drinking establishment, Tavern, Pub,
Besides the most character, movie bars are always crammed with the largest degenerates, perverts, unemployable, alcoholics, and all-around fuck-ups in town.

6) THE BARTENDERS ARE WAY TOO COMPETENT

Let’s be honest, despite all the highly-skilled mixologists within the world today, the barkeep at your average playground remains a twentysomething bozo who can’t remember the contents of a rum and Coke. Movie bartenders, on the opposite hand, aren’t just brilliant drink makers, they’re sages, ready to offer stunning insights about the globe after just some moments of chatting with a stranger.

 

ALSO READ: Experiencing Movies Like ever before in IMAX Theaters

 

7) THE BOUNCERS ARE WAY TOO MENACING

Whenever I encounter a bouncer plunked ahead of a bar, he’s usually too busy playing QuizUp on his Droid to hoist his fatass of the little stool to test my ID. But within the movies bouncers are men so musclebound, so focused on the work, they must surely be working security for the Sultan of Brunei, not guarding the Roxbury.

8) EVERYONE WANTS TO FIGHT

Then again, maybe these menacing bouncers are necessary, because, within the movies, people don’t head to bars to socialize and find shit-faced, nope, they’re only there hoping to fight. An accidentally spilled drink, an incidental bump or shove, even asking someone about their former profession as a shoeshine boy will sooner or later result in a fistfight at a movie bar.

9) CUSTOMERS CAN DO AS THEY PLEASE

they’re kinda being drunken assholes in my book when customers are ostensibly being “nice” in movie bars, though. If two patrons jumped on the bar without permission and loudly started singing “Bennie and the Jets,” impeding every other customers’ ability to induce to the bar and order a drink, On what planet would anyone be pleased?

10) GETTING A DRINK ISN’T THAT IMPORTANT

Then again…getting a drink just isn’t that important for movie characters. Within the universe, sure, people move to bars to mingle with friends and toy with the alternative sex, but they’re mainly there to drink. And, if a bartender hasn’t acknowledged us after some minutes we start losing our shit. Not in movie bars, where people have all the time within the world to look at their bartenders dick around with bottles or dance atop the bar.

11) BUT GETTING “A BEER” IS

Of course, movie bars are the sole place that, when your bartender asks you what you would like to drink, you’ll answer within the generic…and, amazingly, he’ll still go fetch you something. Even Stanley Kubrick, famous for his excruciating attention to detail, was guilty of this. I used to be stunned the primary time I watched Eyes Wide Shut as Tom Cruise’s Dr. Bill character took a seat at the Sonata Cafe and ordered “a beer” without stating a brand.

12) …AND THEY’RE NEVER CROWDED

Finally, movies want you to believe their characters only soak up bars during hours when they’re completely empty. More likely, the assembly simply doesn’t want to pay any extras to fill out the scene.

 

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