Monthly Archives: September 2020

Monthly Archives: September 2020

How Movie Tickets are Priced and where it Goes?

The way how businesses like https://www.ponfish.com/top-best-countertop-microwaves-for-seniors/ is making money is different from how movies do it. Because in movies, especially Hollywood, the breakdown is 45% to 55% whereas the former goes to the movie theater and the latter is to the movie studio.

Meaning to say, if a ticket costs like 10 dollars, then the theater that showed it will get $4.50 while the studio gets $5.50. For the theater, the $4.50 goes to the maintenance, drinks, foods, employees and several other costs. As for the studio, it can be divided into the groups below.

Marketing and Advertising, $2.11

Most of the time, anticipated blockbuster movies have the top marketing budget that goes north of 100 million dollars. Newspaper, radio ads and TV commercials, billboards as well as internet marketing are all used in order to drive ticket sales. When the market research and also, preview trailers are factored in, the studio look thoroughly to its budget.

Production, $1.71

This figure will include virtually every cost aside from the actor’s talent fee. Oftentimes, this will cover the following:

  • Sets
  • Permits
  • Costumes
  • Insurance
  • Employee salary

Movie Distribution, $1

As a matter of fact, 10 percent of every ticket will go to the distribution of movie reels. It seems to be a high figure just to pay thousands per movie reel but at times, the movies are sought after that they need to be shipped with security.

Actors, $.68

This percentage is going to vary from studios and $.68 already represents a huge cast film. In the event that the movie doesn’t spend much on its actors, then extra percentages will be added to other 3 categories.

The theater chain will be setting the prices for movie tickets and not the studio that has created the movie. If the cost increase for a theater, then it’s two times difficult for them to boost revenue since they are losing 55 percent for each ticket.

So to compensate for it, movie theaters are increasing ticket prices more than what it has to be. So long as this cycle continues, expect a constant increase in the price of your movie tickets in the future.

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Some of the Best Motorcycle Movies

While television has embraced motorcycles, check out Sons Of Anarchy, The Walking Dead, American Chopper that is not so much the situation with feature-length movies. There is not a lot, are there? Laments actor Eric Bana, a long-time rider that tools around on a Triumph Thruxton from the 2007 romantic humor Lucky You. To learn more about motorcycles products, read unbiased reviews of bluetooth helmets.

Despite this shortage, there are a couple of icons that able to utilize their Hollywood clout to find some decent pictures created, most notably Steve McQueen, Peter Fonda, and Ewan McGregor. Following is a list of people worth a watch for the part-time enthusiast.

Easy Rider (1969)

There is a really strong argument with this being the best motorcycle movie ever produced. Peter Fonda and Dennis Hoppers’ trip to New Orleans is the focus of the film, as would be the bicycles made by Fonda himself. A bourbon-swigging Jack Nicholson is only icing on the cake.

The Scene: It will not get much better than the opening scene, where Fonda and Hopper cruise the open sidewalk and bridges to Steppenwolf’s Born to be Wild.

The Motorcycle Diaries (2004)

Based on the journals of Ernesto Che Guevara through an Extraordinary trip through South America with his friend Alberto en route to a medical profession, this is the strangest wanderlust movie. Riding through the magnificent jungle of Argentina and Peru, both consider the meaning of life while pursuing tail and pursuing sunsets. Additionally, it appears to be the job that created Gael Garcia Bernal a global celebrity.

The Scene: The scene is magnificent through the film, But specifically if both are driving Argentina on the rear of the Norton 500, together with all the snow-crested peaks rising ahead of them.

One Week (2008)

Once an introverted person named Ben learns he has stage IV cancer using a 10 percent chance of success, he does exactly the sole logical thing need to do to buy a 1973 Norton Commando 850 and heads west. Driving beyond scenic Canadian landmarks such as Lake Superior, the film is all about experience and the curative advantages of grabbing life from the handlebars.

The Scene: Ben’s inspiration for his experience comes as he sees a group of cyclists pass on the road, a completely relatable scene.

The Darjeeling Limited (2007)

A bicycle accident inspires Francis (Owen Wilson) to haul his two brothers and a trip of self-discovery, bringing them back together after years of estrangement. But that does not stop the trio from leaping on the rear of a Hero Honda to flee throughout the Rajasthan Desert on the trip to their mommy’s convent. The film makes it obvious there are lots of excellent ways to see India, however on the rear of a 100cc bike is unquestionably the finest, if able to manage the traffic.

The Scene: The three riding one bicycle conversing as they pass Rajasthan is the type of road trip just Wes Anderson could dream about.

The Wild One (1953)

The Wild One is one of my favorites for a purpose: Marlon Brando, states Norman Reedus, the celebrity of the Walking Dead and host of a forthcoming ride with Norman Reedus, A bicycle travel series on AMC. Despite an arguably ironic plot about two rival gangs, the film stands tall on the rear of Brando’s genius, and the iconic vision of him perched on his 1950 Triumph 6T Thunderbird.

The Scene: Brando’s Johnny Strabler leaves his favorite pub, Bleeker’s, to observe that the rival gang leader, Chino, sitting on his bike using Johnny’s stolen decoration. “Do not do this,” Johnny says until they participate in an epic struggle.

The Fantastic Escape (1963)

Steve McQueen had a fire for the bike with over 100 machines in his private garage. It is no wonder that he seemed so at ease in addition to this 1961 Triumph TR6 Trophy within this POW story, occurring during WWII. Although the real story the film was based on did not involve bikes in any way, McQueen asked they are written to the script, and they’ve since become the most memorable scenes by far.

The Scene: McQueen’s character Captain Virgil Hilts creates a daring effort to escape by leaping over a barbed wire fence onto his Triumph. Though he gets the very first incredible leap, he wrecks his bicycle in the next period of fencing.

Terminator 2: Judgement Day (1990)

Arnold Schwarzenegger as the unstoppable Terminator selects a Beastly Harley-Davidson Fat Boy version FLSTF because of his brakes. Collectively both sensibly iconic machines put waste to city blocks in this unbelievably entertaining sequel whilst combating the T-1000 and protecting a young John Connor.

The Scene: This film has undoubtedly among the trendiest bike scenes. John Connor jumps on his dirt bicycle to escape the T-1000, while the Terminator isn’t much behind on his Fat Boy along with his trusty shotgun in hand. The trio of all combatants cruises through San Fernando Valley’s Bull Creek and Schwarzenegger even carries his Harley airborne at a hopeless stunt to save the day.

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Multisensory Met :The Development of Multisensory Art Exhibits

In 2015, The Met collaborated with Multimedia Lab to explore ways museums can make the exhibits accessible to partially sighted and blind visitors.

Ezgi Ucar, a former Intern at MediaLab, Digital Media, shared the design ideas the Met approved for its Access Programs and Community Programs dubbed as The Multisensory Met. The goal was to widen the range of museum audience by including people with impaired senses or disability, regardless of age and background.

In The Met 150, Ezgi Ucar wrote descriptions of the suite of products that made some of Met’s collection accessible to everyone regardless of sensory and physical impairments.

Some Examples of Multisensory Arts That Formed Part of The Multisensory Met Experience

Multisensory Sculptures

Much too often, museum visitors experience the urge to touch or smell and even taste some of the objects displayed at a museum. Of particular interests are the beautiful sculptures in the African, American and Oceanic galleries, mainly because the indigenous artists who created the fascinating sculptures used different materials: wood, metal, shell or resin.

In addition, as the figurines were mostly found in burial sides, the sculptures contained dirt and clay from the burial ground and/or from riversides, as well as hammers, blades and similar hardware.

Ezgi Ucar replicated versions of certain figurines using the materials used and added to the sculpture, which visitors are allowed to touch, smell or taste. When touched, Ezgi’s replica statue will produce a buzz sound to indicate ongoing interaction.

Sound Paintings

Here, Ezgi used reproductions of some of The Met’s collection of paintings like Jean Monet’s “Hobby Horse,’ Ezgi transformed the reproductions into sound-sensitive art objects by attaching sound switches. The switch plates were cut into shapes based on the form of the major elements of the painting. When someone touches a particular element, ambient sound related to the element of painting is produced. As with “Hobby Horse,” the ambient sound for the elements include a child talking, the sound of rolling carriage wheels and of a neighing horse.

Scratch-and-Sniff Paintings

Using powdered scents, incense, and spices, Ezgi stamped the fragrances on different photos that form part of a painting. She took inspiration from the scratch-and-sniff stickers and used the same method that will allow visitors to scratch and sniff some of the photographed parts of the painting.

An example is the “Garden at Sainte-Adresse” by Claude Monet, on which Ezgi stamped floral, spicy cocoa and salt-water scents.

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