Monthly Archives: June 2020

Monthly Archives: June 2020

Changes in Movie Industry from Past to Present

Much like in any other industries, technology changed the game in film industry. This includes how these movies are being edited, how the audience is watching them and even on the actual process of moviemaking. The truth is, some of the methods used in filmmaking are even used in creating YouTube videos and its content creators are buying cheap YouTube views to make it look credible.

Let us face the fact that technology simplified and streamlined the processes in moviemaking. Almost 5 decades ago, cameras are operated by a full crew and if they wished to get aerial shot, a camera is mounted to an aircraft which is really time-consuming. And after the scene was captured, the editing was physically done by cutting as well as pasting it together, which isn’t an entirely efficient and effective process if you’d look at it.

Dawn of New Age

These days though, new and lighter cameras have enabled clearer and crisper images. Plus, the shots that were thought impossible were now possible. If before, cameras have to be mounted physically to an aircraft, today a drone equipped with a camera can be used in capturing a scene. It can be controlled from afar while still getting awesome camera angle.

With these new innovations in technology, not just the fact that moviemakers are able to make exceptional films but also, make savings when making one.

In addition to that, with the integration of Cloud computing technology, movie editing has been easier than ever as everyone who is involved in the project can collaborate. This literally opened up new stage for moviemakers that were never anticipated before.

It’s a Win-Win for Everyone

As for the audience, it isn’t necessary to go to local theaters just to see a movie. There are streaming services that permitted viewers to watch movies wherever and whenever they feel so.

With all these things said, technology has brought the movie industry from the simple and dull black-and-white movies to high definition definitions to 4K or at times, 8K quality. With this level of picture quality, anyone who watches a movie be it in a movie house or in their home will definitely be stunned by it.

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Celebrities Coming Out, Giving Support to Black Lives Matter Movement

A nationwide call for change has been sweeping across all 50 states of America. Spurred by a policeman’s blatant killing of George Floyd in broad daylight and in public view. The height of police brutality has reached its limit that citizens of all color, race, religion, social and political standing are one in calling for reforms to end all injustices against people of color.

Many well known personalities, musicians and Hollywood actors left the comfort of their plush home to join the Black Lives Matter protesters. They did so not for purposes of publicity as many tried to remain incognito, lest they draw unnecessary attention. Still, they shared their exoeriences to fans via Instagram.

Some others have donated money to foundations that have been intervening on behalf of protesters who were arrested. To date, an outpouring of financial donations are available to use as bail money and/ or go back to continue supporting the George Floyd/Black Lives Matter peaceful rallies.

Some of the accounts to which donations go to include the Peoples City Council Freedom Fund, the Minnesota Freedom Fund, and the Louisville Community Bail Fund, Mivement 4 Black Lives, The Bail Project and the National Lawyers Guild.

Celebrities Who Actually Joined the Peaceful Demonstrations

Among Hollywood personalities who were firsts to join the protest marches organized in Los Angeles is Kristen Stewart and real-life partner Dylan Meyer.

Ariana Grande also came out to join demonstrators in Beverly Hills, although somewhat disappointed that the media preferred to cover the looting incidents in Santa Monica.

On Friday, Jamie Foxx showed up in the streets of Minneapolis to join black community leaders and the crowd of protesters, but begged not to be interviewed as he was quoted as saying that he is not there as a celebrity.

The Masked Singer host, Nick Cannon also joined the protest in Minneapolis, wearing a shirt carrying George Floyd’s last words “Please I can’t breathe,”

Over the weekend, Tessa Thompson joined and documented the take-a-knee demonstrations in Los Angeles, but which she reported to have escalated when members of the LAPD arrived.

John Boyega led the Black Lives Matter rally in Hyde Park, London saying he does not mind if he will still have a career.

 

John Cusack’s protest experience in Chicago included a violent encounter with policemen, who came at him with batons, and hit his bike to stop him from taking videos of a burning car.

Kevin Hart, Tyrese Gibson and Ludacris showed support to the movement at George Floyd’s memorial.

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Techniques Behind Awesome Car Scenes

Movie car scenes, particularly high speed chases, can make our heart pump with excitement because they look so dangerously real and terrifying. What could be the techniques used by filmmakers when creating spectacular action scenes inside moving cars?

 

Not a few of those involved in filming car scenes say that those are among the most difficult and expensive shots of modern action movies. There was a time when actors merely acted everything out, from driving the car to making viewers believe they are being chased at breakneck speed. Yet that was a long time ago, when a technique called chroma keying or chroma key compositing was the only and safest method to use in shooting footage of car scenes.

Overview of the Chroma Key Compositing Method

Chroma key compositing is actually a method used in creating visual effects, mostly as part of the post production processes. This technique is widely harnessed not only in movie making but in other fields as well, such as in video game development and in newscasting. Two images or video streams are fused together, by laying one on top of the other.

Earlier chroma key compositing methods entailed removing the background of one image or video clip, whilst using the other image or video as new background. The contemporary version of this approach, made the compositing or layering process easier by shooting or filming an actor or subject against a “green or blue screen.”

Post production technicians will then insert the desired background image or footage, as backdrop of the foreground actor or object in ways that will allow the green or blue screen to become transparent. The chroma keying process will then make it appear that the footage of the actor or object was filmed in a setting or location deemed appropriate for a particular scene.

In more ambitious film projects and in the most successful ones like the “Fast and the Furious” film franchise, other techniques using camera mounts and process trailers are the key elements for creating riveting car scenes with maximum reality.

A Brief Glimpse at How “Fast and the Furious” Movies were Made to Look Superbly Realistic

A film-making technique that can create realistic scenes on a different level, is one in which actors are actually riding in a stationary car, while acting in real time background. As an actor is made to appear as if he or she is actually driving a car, the filming process requires the use of a process trailer.

What is a Process Trailer

A process trailer is a trailer used as a low platform on which to load a vehicle where an actor or his/her stunt double, acts out a scene inside a non-moving car. The stationary car will still appear as a moving vehicle in the filmed footage because a tracking trailer tows the low platform on which the car is positioned. At the same time, the tracking trailer also serves as a moving camera platform, where the camera men take positions in front, on both sides, and on top of the towing vehicle.

The production team of the “The Fast and the Furious” franchise films takes pride in sharing that they also used a fleet of real cars to make every difficult car scene incredibly realistic. Dennis McCarthy, the lead car coordinator for four of the “Fast and Furious” series, said they actually purchased cars to partially or fully destroy.

As part of the filming processes, McCarthy’s crew built identical copies as backup vehicles to use, after one has been totally wrecked or damaged intentionally for a film segment. He also let out the secret that when it comes to buying junk cars, they usually have to meticulously comb classified ads.

They were able to track down cars in models and make that they were looking for, in the Mojave desert. Each piece cost them at least $7,000 plus cost of towing service san jose, because most of the cars they bought were actually “90 percent garbage.”

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